2021 Prenscia Technology Days – Virtual Seminar Series

2021 Prenscia Technology Days – Virtual Seminar Series

Watch and download presentations

This 6-part series of 90-minute virtual seminars focuses on joints & welds, wire-DED Additive Manufacturing, surface treatment, fatigue testing & characterisation for aircraft structures, automotive and ground vehicle structures and electric vehicle battery structures.

Fill out the form below to download the PDFs and watch the full presentations from organizations such as:

  • NIO
  • University of Warwick
  • Prenscia (HBK)
  • Cranfield University
  • Coventry University
  • University of Strathclyde
  • Select Engineering Services
  • USAF
  • AV8R Consulting
Session #1: Fatigue Simulation of Joints
Session overview

A wide range of joints are used to assemble structures including welds, rivets, bolts, adhesives, between similar and dis-similar materials - metals, polymers and composites. These joints distribute load into or through the structure, and when these loads vary during operational use they introduce fatigue cycling at and close to the joint. The local geometry detail at the joint acts as a stress raiser reducing the fatigue strength at the joint. Any evaluation of the durability of the structure must therefore place a high priority on a fatigue assessment of the joints. 

This seminar presents an overview of fatigue simulation methods to predict the fatigue performance of joints and focusses on the stress severity factor method commonly used to give an indication of which locations are fatigue critical in an aircraft structural joint. 

Introducing Fatigue Testing and Fatigue Simulation of Structural Joints
Dr. Andrew Halfpenny, Chief Technologist, Prenscia (HBK)
The Stress Severity Factor in Joint Fatigue Life of Aircraft Structures
Mr. Steve Dosman, FRAeS, AV8R Consulting
Modelling Stress Severity and Bearing Bypass in nCode DesignLife from FE Stress Analysis
Mr. Paul Roberts, Product Manager, Prenscia (HBK)
Session #2: Fatigue Simulation of Welds
Session overview

Welding is a commonly used and effective method for making structural joints between metal parts. However, the nature of the welding process means that these welds generally have a fatigue strength that is inferior to that of the parts being joined together. The result is that, even in a well-designed structure, the welded joints are likely to fatigue. Any evaluation of the durability of a welded structure must therefore place a high priority on a fatigue assessment of the welded joints. 

This presents applications and methods for the fatigue life prediction of welds from finite element results. These include mesh insensitive structural stress techniques for both shell and solid elements making model generation less time-consuming. This concludes by describing the material testing and subsequent fatigue characterization required to obtain the bending and membrane weld fatigue curves for seam weld and spot weld damage models. 

Fatigue Simulations of Welded Joints at NIO
Mr Artur Tarasek, Durability CAE, NIO
Fatigue Life Prediction of Welds from Finite Element Results
Mr. Jeff Mentley, Prenscia (HBK)
Thin Sheet Welded Joint Fatigue Testing, Failure Mode Validation and Failure Criteria
Mr. Rob Plaskitt, Prenscia (HBK)
Session #1: Fatigue Simulation of Joints
Session overview

A wide range of joints are used to assemble structures including welds, rivets, bolts, adhesives, between similar and dis-similar materials - metals, polymers and composites. These joints distribute load into or through the structure, and when these loads vary during operational use they introduce fatigue cycling at and close to the joint. The local geometry detail at the joint acts as a stress raiser reducing the fatigue strength at the joint. Any evaluation of the durability of the structure must therefore place a high priority on a fatigue assessment of the joints. 

This seminar presents an overview of fatigue simulation methods to predict the fatigue performance of joints and focusses on the stress severity factor method commonly used to give an indication of which locations are fatigue critical in an aircraft structural joint. 

Introducing Fatigue Testing and Fatigue Simulation of Structural Joints
Dr. Andrew Halfpenny, Chief Technologist, Prenscia (HBK)
The Stress Severity Factor in Joint Fatigue Life of Aircraft Structures
Mr. Steve Dosman, FRAeS, AV8R Consulting
Modelling Stress Severity and Bearing Bypass in nCode DesignLife from FE Stress Analysis
Mr. Paul Roberts, Product Manager, Prenscia (HBK)
Session #2: Fatigue Simulation of Welds
Session overview

Welding is a commonly used and effective method for making structural joints between metal parts. However, the nature of the welding process means that these welds generally have a fatigue strength that is inferior to that of the parts being joined together. The result is that, even in a well-designed structure, the welded joints are likely to fatigue. Any evaluation of the durability of a welded structure must therefore place a high priority on a fatigue assessment of the welded joints. 

This presents applications and methods for the fatigue life prediction of welds from finite element results. These include mesh insensitive structural stress techniques for both shell and solid elements making model generation less time-consuming. This concludes by describing the material testing and subsequent fatigue characterization required to obtain the bending and membrane weld fatigue curves for seam weld and spot weld damage models. 

Fatigue Simulations of Welded Joints at NIO
Mr Artur Tarasek, Durability CAE, NIO
Fatigue Life Prediction of Welds from Finite Element Results
Mr. Jeff Mentley, Prenscia (HBK)
Thin Sheet Welded Joint Fatigue Testing, Failure Mode Validation and Failure Criteria
Mr. Rob Plaskitt, Prenscia (HBK)
Session #3: Wire-Arc Additive Manufacturing
Session overview

Cranfield University are leading a five-year research programme with multiple UK universities for New Wire Additive Manufacturing “NEWAM”. This is a directed energy deposition additive manufacturing technology, with research focus on process, material and structural integrity. Linear “walls” of material are manufactured for cutting and machining into test specimens for non-destructive and destructive tests. Coventry University are leading the “Material Performance and Structural Integrity” of NEWAM, determining structural integrity through fatigue initiation, fatigue fracture, and residual stress. Prenscia are contributing mechanical fatigue testing services and material characterization services to this NEWAM research programme. 

New Wire Additive Manufacturing (NEWAM) programme for next generation wire based additive manufacture
Prof. Stewart Williams, Director of the Welding Engineering and Laser Processing Centre, Cranfield University
Structural Integrity of Titanium Ti-6Al-4V additively manufactured by w-DED
Professor Xiang Zhang, Coventry University
Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue Behaviour of Titanium Ti-6Al-4V additively manufactured by w-DED
Dr. Abdul Khadar Syed, Coventry University; Mr. Rob Plaskitt, Prenscia (HBK)
Session #4: Surface Treatment of Aircraft Structures
Session overview

Aircraft landing gear manufacturing and overhaul/maintenance processes alter surface material properties that influence fatigue life. As aging aircraft continue to be pushed beyond their originally intended service life, it has become increasingly critical to characterize specific surface processing conditions. For this reason, Select Engineering Services, General Atomics and Prenscia are conducting research/testing to develop tools and methods that incorporate surface treatment effects in USAF landing gear fatigue models. 

Laser shock peening is an emerging technology used for enhancement of the fatigue performance of safety critical components and structures. This is achieved through introduction of a beneficial compressive residual stress field in the near surface layer of the component which counteracts applied tensile stresses and so extends the fatigue life. In the aerospace industry laser shock peening has been applied to the root of engine turbine blades and wing attachment lugs.

 

An Introduction to the Requirements for Safe-Life of Landing Gear for Aging Aircraft through Overhaul and Maintenance Processes
Mr. Andrew Clark, Landing Gear Systems, USAF
Tools and Methods for Landing Gear Fatigue Analysis with Surface Treatment Effects
Mr. Ben Griffiths, Chief Engineer, Select Engineering Services
Residual Stress Generation Using Laser Shock Peening and Applications to Improve Aircraft Fatigue Performance
Dr. Niall Smyth, Coventry University
Session #3: Wire-Arc Additive Manufacturing
Session overview

Cranfield University are leading a five-year research programme with multiple UK universities for New Wire Additive Manufacturing “NEWAM”. This is a directed energy deposition additive manufacturing technology, with research focus on process, material and structural integrity. Linear “walls” of material are manufactured for cutting and machining into test specimens for non-destructive and destructive tests. Coventry University are leading the “Material Performance and Structural Integrity” of NEWAM, determining structural integrity through fatigue initiation, fatigue fracture, and residual stress. Prenscia are contributing mechanical fatigue testing services and material characterization services to this NEWAM research programme. 

New Wire Additive Manufacturing (NEWAM) programme for next generation wire based additive manufacture
Prof. Stewart Williams, Director of the Welding Engineering and Laser Processing Centre, Cranfield University
Structural Integrity of Titanium Ti-6Al-4V additively manufactured by w-DED
Professor Xiang Zhang, Coventry University
Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue Behaviour of Titanium Ti-6Al-4V additively manufactured by w-DED
Dr. Abdul Khadar Syed, Coventry University; Mr. Rob Plaskitt, Prenscia (HBK)
Session #4: Surface Treatment of Aircraft Structures
Session overview

Aircraft landing gear manufacturing and overhaul/maintenance processes alter surface material properties that influence fatigue life. As aging aircraft continue to be pushed beyond their originally intended service life, it has become increasingly critical to characterize specific surface processing conditions. For this reason, Select Engineering Services, General Atomics and Prenscia are conducting research/testing to develop tools and methods that incorporate surface treatment effects in USAF landing gear fatigue models. 

Laser shock peening is an emerging technology used for enhancement of the fatigue performance of safety critical components and structures. This is achieved through introduction of a beneficial compressive residual stress field in the near surface layer of the component which counteracts applied tensile stresses and so extends the fatigue life. In the aerospace industry laser shock peening has been applied to the root of engine turbine blades and wing attachment lugs.

 

An Introduction to the Requirements for Safe-Life of Landing Gear for Aging Aircraft through Overhaul and Maintenance Processes
Mr. Andrew Clark, Landing Gear Systems, USAF
Tools and Methods for Landing Gear Fatigue Analysis with Surface Treatment Effects
Mr. Ben Griffiths, Chief Engineer, Select Engineering Services
Residual Stress Generation Using Laser Shock Peening and Applications to Improve Aircraft Fatigue Performance
Dr. Niall Smyth, Coventry University
Session #5: Advanced Materials Characterisation & Testing
Session overview

All of the previous seminar sessions in this Prenscia Technology Days virtual seminar series have described or used results from fatigue tests performed by the Prenscia Advanced Materials Characterisation & Testing (AMCT) facility. This seminar presents these facilities and fatigue testing capabilities of the AMCT, and subsequent characterisation into strain-life, stress-life and/or load-life fatigue curves. 

The AMCT specialises in strain-controlled fatigue testing in the low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) regions, typically between 500 and 5,000,000 cycles. Above this, very high cycle fatigue (VHCF) testing introduces additional challenges. 

Mechanical Testing Capabilities at the Prenscia AMCT Facility
Dr. Michelle Hill, Head of Materials Testing, Prenscia (HBK)
The Challenges of Very High Cycle Fatigue Testing
Dr-Ing. Yevgen Gorash, Weir Advanced Research Centre, University of Strathclyde
Fatigue Testing of Materials and Fatigue Characterisation
Dr. Andrew Halfpenny, Prenscia (HBK)
Fatigue Characterisation of Welded Joints
Dr. Cristian Bagni, Prenscia (HBK)
Session #6: Electric Vehicle Battery Durability & Reliability
Session overview

Like their thermal-engine counterparts, electric vehicles are susceptible to structural fatigue failures. The mechanical complexity of the battery structure and its mountings also give rise to significant additional fatigue failure issues. Insights into these structural and vibration-induced failures enable engineers to eliminate the risk of fatigue failure, improve the durability of battery structures, and increase vehicle reliability. 

This seminar considers fatigue design of battery packs, accelerated vibration testing of battery packs and fatigue analysis of electric vehicle structures with industry applications. 

Vibration Durability Testing and its Effect on Electric Vehicle Batteries
Dr. Jim Hooper, Principal Engineer – Electric Vehicle Projects | WMG | University of Warwick
Durability and Reliability of Electric Vehicle Battery Structures
Dr. Andrew Halfpenny, Director of Technology, Prenscia (HBK)
Series summary and close
Prenscia (HBK)
Session #5: Mathematical Modelling for Data Analytics, Durability, and Reliability #1
Session overview

All of the previous seminar sessions in this Prenscia Technology Days virtual seminar series have described or used results from fatigue tests performed by the Prenscia Advanced Materials Characterisation & Testing (AMCT) facility. This seminar presents these facilities and fatigue testing capabilities of the AMCT, and subsequent characterisation into strain-life, stress-life and/or load-life fatigue curves. 

The AMCT specialises in strain-controlled fatigue testing in the low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) regions, typically between 500 and 5,000,000 cycles. Above this, very high cycle fatigue (VHCF) testing introduces additional challenges. 

Mechanical Testing Capabilities at the Prenscia AMCT Facility
Dr. Michelle Hill, Head of Materials Testing, Prenscia (HBK)
The Challenges of Very High Cycle Fatigue Testing
Dr-Ing. Yevgen Gorash, Weir Advanced Research Centre, University of Strathclyde
Fatigue Testing of Materials and Fatigue Characterisation
Dr. Andrew Halfpenny, Prenscia (HBK)
Fatigue Characterisation of Welded Joints
Dr. Cristian Bagni, Prenscia (HBK)
Session #6: Electric Vehicle Battery Durability & Reliability
Session overview

Like their thermal-engine counterparts, electric vehicles are susceptible to structural fatigue failures. The mechanical complexity of the battery structure and its mountings also give rise to significant additional fatigue failure issues. Insights into these structural and vibration-induced failures enable engineers to eliminate the risk of fatigue failure, improve the durability of battery structures, and increase vehicle reliability. 

This seminar considers fatigue design of battery packs, accelerated vibration testing of battery packs and fatigue analysis of electric vehicle structures with industry applications. 

Vibration Durability Testing and its Effect on Electric Vehicle Batteries
Dr. Jim Hooper, Principal Engineer – Electric Vehicle Projects | WMG | University of Warwick
Durability and Reliability of Electric Vehicle Battery Structures
Dr. Andrew Halfpenny, Director of Technology, Prenscia (HBK)
Series summary and close
Prenscia (HBK)

Please fill out the below form to access the archived video and PDF presentations